Category: New Brunswick

Reminder

Reminder

While out for a walk, I saw these two stepping stones leaning against a fence. Suddenly, my thoughts were taken back to our visit to the Maritimes last June. How I’d love to revisit that part of Canada again, as we saw only a small part of what the area had to offer. Sadly, travel may not be in our future, so the memories will have to suffice.

In case you’re interested in seeing some of my Maritime posts:
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part I: New Brunswick At Last
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part II: Shediac for Tourists
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part III: Shediac Marina
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part IV: Lobster Tales
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part V: Prince Edward Island
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part VI: Blue Rocks, Nova Scotia
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part VII: Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part VIII: On the Way to…
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part IX: Hopewell Park
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part X: Magnificent Hopewell Rocks
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part XI: Havre Boucher
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part XII: Cape Breton Island
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part XIII: Houses & Lighthouses
Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part XIV: Maritime Churches

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part XV: A Sad Goodbye

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part XV: A Sad Goodbye

Our trip to the Canadian Atlantic provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island was over all too soon. We made our way to the airport to catch our flight to Toronto, where we had a seven hour layover before heading home to Saskatchewan.
from the air 2
from the air 3
from the air 4

As we flew further, and further, away, we know we’d like to return someday.
Good-bye for now, Atlantic Canada!

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part X: Magnificent Hopewell Rocks

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part X: Magnificent Hopewell Rocks

Our recent trip to Eastern Canada included a visit to the popular Hopewell Park. The stars of the show there are the Hopewell Rocks.
diamond rock 2
Our visit took place sometime between high and low tides, so the rock bases weren’t visible. At low tide, the thin columns hardly look strong enough to hold the weight of the giant monoliths, and there have been collapses in the past.
This formation is the Diamond Rock.
diamond rock
The park trails take hikers to various vantage points where there is a new point of interest to experience and photograph.
flowerpot rocks 2The Flowerpot Rocks also have slim columns that are visible at low tide. You can just see the top of the columns beginning to appear.

rock 1
half hidden rock 2
And some rocks come into view only if the visitor remains alert, and observant.

looking down at the caves
At low tide visitors are allowed to walk the seabed. We were about halfway down the stairs to the caves, but were stopped by a warning sign, on a chain, that blocked our way. Some pigeons were feasting on the small delicacies left on the seabed as the tide receded.

hopewell

The brown water is a result of mud and silt mixing with sea water in the constant churning brought about by the world’s fastest and highest tides in this, the Fundy Region of New Brunswick.

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part IX: Hopewell Park

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part IX: Hopewell Park

On our early summer trip to Eastern Canada, we were treated to many beautiful sights. Some of the most awesome of these were found at Hopewell Park in New Brunswick. On the way there, we passed the Chocolate (Petitcodiac) River. The Tidal Bore, caused by the Bay of Fundy tides, occurs twice daily. The water in the River rolls back upstream in one wave that can go up to 60 cm (19.5 inches) in height.
chocolate river tide outChocolate River
Hopewell Park is part of the Fundy region, where the tides can reach up to 15 metres (50 ft), about the height of a four-storey building, twice daily. The tides can rise an amazing 12 vertical feet per hour, so the area has attendants on staff to guide visitors off the ocean floor, out of the coves, and rock caves, when it’s not safe.
fernsThe trails are bordered by lush ferns, flowering shrubs, and interesting tree forms.
tree bark
mossy treeOn some trees is a type of algae that grows in conjunction with lichens.
mossy trees

smiley rockOne of the park’s visitors decided this smiley rock needed some eyes.

blue benchBenches are placed along the steep trails in case a little rest is in order.

danger sign
And here’s just one of the many danger signs in the park.

deadwood anchor
Driftwood has been used for some interesting displays. Is this one supposed to represent a rake, an anchor, a pick, or what?

deadwood planter
deadwood planter 2
Unfortunately, it was too early in the season for these driftwood planters to display any colourful blooms.
play ship
The park also had an interpretive centre, some play spots for the kids, and picnic places.
But, the real stars of Hopewell Park are the Hopewell Rocks.
I will feature them in my next post!