Tag: park

Memory of the Month VIII

Memory of the Month VIII

I started my blog on June 24, 2017. It’s been a very interesting endeavour. Thank you readers, for visiting, You have made the journey enjoyable! For each like, comment, and follow, you are appreciated more than you could know. Since some of my early posts only had two or three views, I’m reposting one per month that was special to me. Here’s my Memory of the Month for February. (Originally posted on July 10, 2017)

Beauty Restored

Beauty Restored

This restored totem pole, in one of our parks, is of Kwakiutl design. An impressive Thunderbird is perched above a person, a person who is fortunate to have this powerful being watching over him. The Kwakiutl people were almost decimated by disease when the settlers arrived, but now There are about 4000 First Nations people of Kwakiutl descent. I’m glad we have this example of their artistic talent and tradition.

Memory of the Month VII

Memory of the Month VII

I started my blog on June 24, 2017. It’s been a very interesting endeavour. I thank every reader for visiting, You have made the journey fun! For each like, comment, and follow, you are appreciated more than you could know. Since some of my early posts only had three or four views, I’m reposting one per month that was special to me. Here’s my Memory of the Month for January. (Originally posted on September 22, 2017)

A Seat With a View

A Seat With a View

I walked on a hiking trail one lovely summer morning. Several of these rustic benches were situated in spots where the views were particularly serene. Enjoying the  beauty of nature is a very satisfying experience, as long as the mosquitoes aren’t biting!

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Monuments and Memorials

Monuments and Memorials

Above: A four sided monument, each side featuring a brief description of the contributions made to the city and province by Frederick Haultain, Nicholas Davin, James Ross, and Charles Dunning. In the vicinity sit six paper birch trees taken from Runnymede Meadow in Great Windsor Park, Royal Estate near Windsor Castle. The area surrounding the monument is called Speakers’ Corner to emphasize the importance of freedom of speech and assembly in a democratic society. There are ten gas lamps surrounding the corner that come from King Charles Street, London, England near the Houses of Parliament.

 

Below: The Sisters Legacy Statue portrays two Catholic sisters — one, a teacher, and one, a nurse. The monument commemorates the commitment and courage of women who provided education and health care in the early days of Saskatchewan.

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Left: The Honouring Tree was erected as part of the 2010 celebration commemorating one hundred years of settlement by people of African ancestry in Saskatchewan.  It is a symbol of diversity as we remember and honour past contributions of people from many origins who call this province their home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: The Walter Scott statue, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the legislative building of Regina. W. Scott oversaw the construction, which concluded in 1912. He also promoted the creation of the University of Saskatchewan in 1907. Under his leadership, Saskatchewan was one of the first provinces to grant women the right to vote and hold elected office. He did all this, and more, while battling mental illness. He suffered from manic depression (bipolar disorder) his entire life.8561E843-4394-43ED-BBA1-78B59BADB74F

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All these monuments are located in Wascana Park, in Regina.

 

Pelicans & Geese

Pelicans & Geese

This park has a wealth of feathered friends in the summer. Some of my favourite birds to watch are the pelicans. Though they are large, they are graceful fliers.

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The geese are ever-present, and take ownership of the park areas that suit them.  This group lined up nicely for their photo.

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Of course, many more species frequent the park, as it is part of the Wascana Migratory Bird Sanctuary. On the list are terns, wrens, blackbirds, killdeer, sandpipers, swallows, sparrows, and herons to name a few. I’m not quick enough to get pictures of the more timid birds that scatter as soon as I’m within 20 feet. I must think about investing in a zoom lens!