Tag: Regina

Alley Door Art Project – Part V

Alley Door Art Project – Part V

This is the final installment of a series of posts featuring the works of provincial artists that were chosen to be part of the city of Regina’s Alley Door Art Project. The doors are located in the downtown district, and are a lovely change from the usual gang graffiti and that of vandals.

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Alley Door Art Project – Part II

Alley Door Art Project – Part II

This is a continuation of a series of posts featuring the works of provincial artists that were chosen to be part of the city of Regina’s Alley Door Art Project. The doors are located in the downtown district, and are a lovely change from the usual gang graffiti and that of vandals.

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This door isn’t part of the project, but I thought it was quite beautiful.
Maybe it was the door that inspired the city to showcase local artists’ pieces on other doors in the district.

Searching for Sculptures

Searching for Sculptures

I find it very interesting to see what type of sculptures can be found around towns and cities. The giant wheat sheaves above are along the highway near the town of Weyburn, Saskatchewan. Since wheat is a very important crop here on the prairies, it seems appropriate that it would be well represented here.

painted treeThis, and others like it, are situated around Candy Cane Park. To me, they look like something from the world of Dr. Seuss.

conexus sculptureHere’s one that resides in the local Arts Centre. My husband and I had tickets for the Regina Symphony tribute to Pink Floyd in May, but it was cancelled due to the Covid-19 ban on large gatherings. I think the Arts Centre is a fitting place for this modern sculpture.

tornado sculptureThis sculpture commemorates the 1912 tornado that ripped through Regina. You can read about it here. It remains the deadliest tornado in Canadian history, and along with the riots of the dirty thirties, was a traumatic event in Regina’s history. The Wikipedia link also relates the story of Boris Karloff’s connection to the tornado. He was left stranded and broke in the city, when the theatre troupe he traveled with disbanded.

And finally, cemeteries contain many beautiful sculptures, but unfortunately, some have not stood the test of time. I’ve posted photos of many impressive memorials at our city’s oldest cemetery, but haven’t previously posted these.

The Bandstand

The Bandstand

This Victorian style gazebo sits in Wascana Park, but was moved from its original location of Victoria Park in downtown Regina. It’s been here as long as I can remember, so the actual relocation must have been early in the creation of Wascana Park and Wascana Lake. This man-made lake was formed in 1883 by damming Wascana Creek, and the resulting lake became a stock watering hole. When it began to be a recreational spot for the residents of Regina, it was drained and deepened as part of a relief program that employed over 2,000 men during the Great Depression. They used only horse drawn wagons and hand tools to dig and dredge.
When one takes the walk encircling the lake, you pass the bandstand. One day you might see a wedding taking place, or a band composed of bagpipes playing. On yet another day, a rock band might be entertaining an audience seated on the grassy slopes. It’s one of the city’s photographers’ favourite spots, and it’s been the locale for many family photos over its long history.