Tag: Shediac

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part IV: Lobster Tales

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part IV: Lobster Tales

One of the highlights of our recent trip to the Canadian Maritimes was a bay cruise out of Shediac. Our host was a retired lobster fisherman, who kept us thoroughly entertained with his humourous stories. We were treated to either a lobster, or barbecued chicken meal as we toured the bay. Along with the fun and food, we were given a lesson on how to eat a lobster the “Acadian way”, and also everything you could ever want to know about lobsters.
bay - skull island
This island is actually called Skull Island!
ships in harbour
The harbour from the bay. The lighthouse is on the right, and two police boats were anchored there.
police boat
bay
The harbour from the other side.

An old style lobster trap, and a new style trap with the catch of the day.

Some of the decor on our boat.

Back at the dock, we toured the area a little, and saw other boats tied up for the night.

One of the harbour buildings was built to look like a ship, complete with a crow’s nest above, and a pirate in front.

Before we left, we of course had to visit the gift shop, where we signed the guest book. I liked the friendliness, and the sense of humour here, evident even on the shop’s counter. My next posts will take you along to other stops on our holiday, as we bid farewell to Shediac, New Brunswick.

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part III: Shediac Marina

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part III: Shediac Marina

On the recent trip to the eastern provinces of Canada, my husband and I spent three days in Shediac, New Brunswick. During the mornings and afternoons I attended meetings for work, but still had time to do some sightseeing afterward. The marina was a short walk from the hotel. An array of boats were moored there, and a few stood out with brightly coloured paint jobs.
sailing school sign
There was a sailing school for landlubbers to learn the ways of the maritimers.
high work
The only other people we saw there were these, who were hard at work. You wouldn’t catch me up that mast!
le container
I was highly amused that this converted rail car was labeled “Le” Container. It seemed to me that the fact was quite obvious. I wondered if this mass of ropes was as tangled as they looked to be.
marina 2
And more boats.

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part II: Shediac for Tourists

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part II: Shediac for Tourists

On our recent trip to Eastern Canada in June, my husband and I spent the first three days in Shediac, New Brunswick, where I was attending meetings. Luckily, there was time after the day’s work to do some sightseeing. One of my colleagues, a resident of Shediac, took us on a tour of the area.

Above, Shediac’s claim to fame.
The plaque states: This is the world’s largest lobster. It’s made of reinforced concrete and steel, measures 10.7 metres (32.8 feet) in length, 5 metres (16.4 feet) in height, and took three years to complete. It weighs 50 metric tons (110,231 pounds) and rests on a 32 metric ton (70,547 pound) pedestal. It was unveiled June 30, 1990.
shop
We saw many more fun sights, geared toward entertaining the tourists. One of these pirates lost his head. He, and the stocks, provide a photo opportunity.
paddle shack
lobster hut
fisherman sculpture
One of these cute and colourful buildings held a souvenir shop. Outside, you could sit on a barrel and talk to this old fisherman. He’s a great listener!
old style lobster trap
Everywhere we saw the old style lobster traps, brightly painted and sporting the colours and star of the Acadian flag. The yellow star, the Stella Maris, is the symbol of Mary, Acadian national symbol, and patron of the mariners.
Parlee Beach
We then stopped at Parlee Beach, early enough in the year to be deserted. For a prairie girl like me, the Atlantic Ocean was an awesome sight!

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part I: New Brunswick At Last

Atlantic Tour Tidbits – Part I: New Brunswick At Last

sign

I had looked forward to this trip for seven months, and finally the time had come. My husband and I were going to eastern Canada to get a sampling of three of the country’s maritime provinces. On June 1, we landed in New Brunswick at the Greater Moncton Roméo LeBlanc International Airport, which is actually located at Dieppe. We were then shuttled off to Shediac, where I was going to have to attend three days of meetings before our real holiday could begin. We were able to take a walk after the first day of meetings and got a taste of this town.
rhododendrons
The rhododendrons were in bloom. Beautiful!
ship on house
Many yards and houses displayed sailing themed decorations.
ship in yard 2
Some trees caught my eye. These, with the trunks twisted together, and another with lips puckered up and ready for a kiss.

We made our way to John Lyons Park.
John Lyons park sign
The grass  was wet, and a little overgrown in some places, as the area had been getting a lot of rain. There was a row of birdhouses near the shore. When I’d near one with a bird in the entrance, the bird would fly to the hole of another birdhouse in the line. I think it was trying to draw me away from the actual birdhouse where it was nesting.
JL park birdhouse
The coastline was a little craggy, yet beautiful. I could have spent a lot more time there, but we had to get back to the hotel, and meet my colleagues for dinner at one of the local Shediac restaurants, Gabriele.
looking out from JL park 2
Our last look at the ocean for today.